Biosignature assessment at 2 weeks out

July 8, 2013

I’ve been having biosignature body fat caliper tests throughout this prep (as I have in previous years) – I had one at about 8 weeks out, one at about 4 weeks out and one today (just under two weeks out – eek!)

As mentioned previously, what I’m always most interested in when it comes to these tests, and like to compare each time, is the skinfold measurements themselves.

Here are the readings from today –
8 weeks out vs 4 weeks out vs 2 weeks out!

Chin: 5.6mm/3.8mm/3.6mm (-0.2mm since last time, -2mm total (so far!))
Cheek (face… !): 8.4mm/7.6mm/7.4mm (-0.2mm since last time, -4mm total)
Pec: 1.8mm/1.8mm/1.8mm (no change)
Triceps: 14.4mm/11.4mm/12.2mm (up 0.8mm since last time (hm!), -2.2mm total)
Sub scap: 6.8mm/6.0mm/5.8mm (-0.2mm since last time, -1mm total)
Mid aux: 3.3mm/2.8mm/2.6mm (-0.2mm since last time, -0.7mm total)
Suprailic: 6.4mm/4.6mm/4.4mm (-0.2mm since last time, -2mm total)
Umbilical: 8.4mm/7.0mm/5.8mm (-1.2mm since last time, -2.6mm total)
Knee: 6.6mm/6.6mm/5.6mm (-1mm since last time, -1mm total)
Calf: 13.0mm/10.6mm/9.6mm (-1mm since last time, -3.4mm total)
Quadricep: 21.2mm/17.0mm/15.4mm (-1.6mm since last time, -5.8mm total)
Hamstring: 17.6mm/13.2mm/10.8mm (-2.4mm since last time, -6.8mm total)

(Really hope my mental arithmetic is correct – it’s 9pm on a hot evening on my lowest carb day of the week with 13 days to go til comp. HELP ME WHERE IS MY ABACUS! ๐Ÿ˜‰ )

I’m really pleased with the quad and hamstring (leg) readings – my legs were lagging behind and, although I could see with my own eyes that they’d started to come in well over the last two weeks, it’s good to have it clarified in numbers. I’m not sure why I now have a fat tricep! All I can do is press on, keep doing what I’m doing, and trust that it will come down eventually.

Biosig experts, if you have any thoughts, comments or suggestions on my tricksy triceps, let me know!

So, that’s a total of another 7.4mm off in these past two weeks, to add to the 21.1mm off between the previous two tests.

I’m pleased!

Running all the skinfolds through the Poliquin software today gave me a reading of 8.9% bodyfat today (-0.8% from 2 weeks ago and 3.5% from 8-ish weeks ago) which I’m pleased with for this stage in prep (don’t forget that I plan to have a good long season of comps – this first competition in two weeks is not the only goal). Putting the same skinfolds through the 7-site Jackson/Pollock bodyfat calculation brings me out at 12.08% which I’m also happy with.

Regardless of the final number, I use these test results as one part of an ongoing set of markers to chart progress.

That’s me done for the night! Byeeee!

You can get in touch with Aimee, who did my biosig, at her website – Tunbridge Wells Kent Personal Trainer or connect with Aimee on Facebook or Twitter.

Biosignature assessment at 2 weeks out is a post from The Fit Writer blog.

Nicola Joyce – the Fit Writer – is a freelance copywriter and journalist who writes for the sport and fitness industry. Her main website is here.

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Biosignature assessment at 4 weeks out

June 21, 2013

I had a biosignature re-test today (if you’re interested in reading more about biosignature testing, or seeing the results of all of mine, I’ve put all the relevant posts together here: biosignature test blog posts).

I had my first biosig of this prep four weeks ago exactly and went back to see Kent biosig practitioner Aimee Stevens today for a retest.

2013 prep biosigs

Here’s the screenshot with both tests on (click to enlarge). Ignore the weight (which is the weight of me, my bottle of water and my meals) and, to an extent, ignore the bodyfat % (I say that partly because every method differs, and also because the % takes bodyweight into account). What I’m always most interested in, and like to compare each time, is the skinfold measurements themselves.

Here are the readings –
8 weeks out vs 4 weeks out
Chin: 5.6mm/3.8mm (-1.8mm)
Cheek (face… !): 8.4mm/7.6mm (-0.8mm)
Pec: 1.8mm/1.8mm (no change)
Triceps: 14.4mm/11.4mm (-3mm)
Sub scap: 6.8mm/6.0mm (-0.8mm)
Mid aux: 3.3mm/2.8mm (-0.5mm)
Suprailic: 6.4mm/4.6mm (-1.8mm)
Umbilical: 8.4mm/7.0mm (-1.4mm)
Knee: 6.6mm/6.6mm (no change – hmmm!)
Calf: 13.0mm/10.6mm (-2.4mm)
Quadricep: 21.2mm/17.0mm (-4.2mm – yippee!)
Hamstring: 17.6mm/13.2mm (-4.4mm – also yippee!)

If my end-of-the-week maths serves me right, that’s a total of 21.1mm off – with the biggest changes being in 1) hamstring 2) quad and 3) calf. Looks like it’s been all about the legs this past month!

What I liked about today’s retest is that (most of!) the areas which were a bit too high for my liking last time have come down (legs in particular). And now everything is a bit more in line and even – with the exception of that knee reading!

All the number-crunching gave me a reading of 9.7% bodyfat today (-2.7% from 4 weeks ago) which I’m very pleased with. Whether or not we think it’s a true 9.7%, it doesn’t matter – I use it as a measurement and a set of numbers to compare against each other each time. Given that I was (by biosig testing/measurement methods) 6.7% in 2011 around the time of my qualifier competition, and then 4.1% for the BNBF British Finals, I feel in a good place given that I have four weeks left until my qualifier this year.

As long as everything’s moving in the right direction, I’m happy.

I’ll be heading back for another test in a few weeks – by which time I hope to have leaner knees ๐Ÿ˜‰ (and leaner everything else for that matter).

So, here we are with 4 weeks (on Sunday) to go til my qualifier! I’m having a long catch-up with coach Vicky next week, to discuss training and diet changes for the next few weeks. Exciting! ๐Ÿ˜€

Have you ever had a biosignature assessment?

You can get in touch with Aimee, who did my biosig, at her website – Tunbridge Wells Kent Personal Trainer or connect with Aimee on Facebook or Twitter.

Biosignature assessment at 4 weeks out is a post from The Fit Writer blog.

Nicola Joyce – the Fit Writer – is a freelance copywriter and journalist who writes for the sport and fitness industry. Her main website is here.


New biosignature assessment for 2013

June 4, 2013

Nearly two weeks ago now (where is the time going…?!) I had another biosignature assessment. Long-time readers might recall that I had my first biosig about a month out from the BNBF British Finals in 2011, and a follow-up assessment just a few days before the Final, and then one biosig last year, as well.

Whilst I recognise that they’re not necessarily completely accurate (what method of body-composition testing is, other than autopsy? ๐Ÿ˜‰ ), I do find the data fascinating. For more information about the biosig method and assessment, take a look at my previous biosig blog posts (linked to above) or Google it. Briefly: it’s a skinfold test, using calipers, which assesses 12 specific sites on the body that relate to individual hormones. The result shows your hormonal profile, and the practitioner can then advise on lifestyle, training and nutrition tweaks you can make to get you healthier (and leaner, if that’s your bag).

And, like any form of measurement, I like using biosig tests as comparisons as I make my merry way along the Path of Prep.

So, I had a biosig test two weeks ago with a biosig practitioner here in Kent – Aimee Stevens. She hasn’t calipered me previously and it’s worth bearing in mind that different practitioners will do things slightly differently, no matter how hard they try to replicate the process. My reading came out as 12.4% bodyfat which I was pleased enough with at the time (just over 8 weeks out from my qualifier) although I would hope (and am confident that) it’s come down from then. I’ll be going back in a few weeks to find out!

Here’s the report (clicking on it ought to enlarge it)
photo

And here’s what Aimee had to say:

The Biosignature Modulation body fat assessment is a testing criteria devised by Charles Poliquin, based on the hypothesis that individual body fat testing sites are hormone modulated, therefore allowing practitioners to target site specific fat loss.

Nicola Joyce 24th May 2013
Body fat percentage is currently 12.4% (lean body mass 55.6 kgs)

Priorities:
Hamstrings (estrogens)
Calves (growth hormone/sleep)
Triceps (testosterone)

Body fat is good/lean, therefore it is perhaps more insightful to look at each individual site reading comparatively and set targets from here in order to achieve increased leanness for competition. One thing to bear in mind: the Biosignature Modulation testing is devised solely as a tool to reduce body fat, therefore – no matter how optimal the site readings are – it will always point out priority sites 1, 2, and 3 for focus. Under โ€˜normalโ€™ circumstances I would encourage Nicola to maintain this body fat percentage, however for competition it is a different ball game!

Very optimal sites are seen in her chin/cheek, representing a good overall leanness. The pec site reading is low, as is sub-scapular (hypothesised to represent high carbohydrate tolerance), mid axillary (thyroid), supra-illiac (insulin), and umbilical (cortisol).

Hamstring – first priority – would be the first port of call for reducing body fat in this case. For a female, 17.7mm is a good lean hamstring, and as discussed this is no cause for concern. For Nicola to reduce this further we would firstly look at any exogenous exposure to estrogen toxins (for example non-organic produce, plastic exposure, cleaning products, cosmetics, etc). My second step would be to optimise Nicolaโ€™s ability to detoxify:
– Improve gut health, mainly through a high quality pro-biotic and increased fibre
– Ensure diet is antioxidant rich, greens supplements are a fantastic way of boosting levels
– Supplement with a good B complex, high quality fish oil, magnesium, possibly zinc

I do not personally feel Nicola would need to follow an estrogen detoxification specific protocol at this point, but would encourage her to keep her (filtered) water high, and drink lots of green tea. It is interesting that Nicolaโ€™s quad reading is 21.2mm, which is slightly high for 12.4% body fat. The quad reading is hypothesised to be indicative of estrogens that your body is producing, for example being on the contraceptive pill. In combination with the guidance above, perhaps sauna protocols (infrared if it is available) might be useful in reducing this site.

Calves as priority 2 is slightly high again for a lean girl, so 12.4% (double the fat as on her hips for example!), therefore lifestyle changes to induce sleep should be put into place at this important stage, and increased magnesium should help. Triceps being third priority is slightly unusual for such as muscular lean girl (14.4%). I often find that heavy weights reduces this site. I would expect this to be well below 10mm for Nicola. Her next training stage is higher volume, which should lead to a reduction in this site, but Nicola could also look at boosting zinc which is a testosterone modulator.

profile_aimeeAimee is a registered biosignature practioner, holds credentials from top UK universities, further certification from the Australian Performance Training Institute, and has worldwide experience of training 100+ clients across 3 continents.

You can get in touch with Aimee at her website – Tunbridge Wells Kent Personal Trainer or connect with Aimee on Facebook or Twitter.

Thanks Aimee and see you again soon!

New biosignature assessment for 2013 is a post from The Fit Writer blog.

Nicola Joyce – the Fit Writer – is a freelance copywriter and journalist who writes for the sport and fitness industry. Her main website is here.


My Biosignature starting point, and advice for combating stress

June 17, 2012

If you were reading the blog last year, you may remember that I had a couple of BioSignature assessments in the latter stages of my competition prep: the first one about a month out from the BNBF British Finals and then a follow-up assessment just a few days before the Final.

Well, I’m not quite that close to getting on stage yet this year, but I thought I’d go and get assessed again, so my BioSignature friend Ben could help me get good and lean again for when I do step on stage!

(Small print: which will be 12 weeks today)

Please refer to my previous BioSig blog posts (linked to above) for more information about BioSig itself (or Google it) since it’s too much to go into here. A quick explanation is that it’s a skinfold test, using calipers, which assesses 12 specific sites on the body that relate to individual hormones. The result shows your hormonal profile, and the idea is then that the practitioner can advise on nutritional, lifestyle and supplement changes to help get you healthier and leaner.

So, how did my most recent BioSig go? At 13 weeks out, I was well aware that I was nothing like as lean as last time I had the assessment done. I’ve been going through (and continue to go through) numerous “lifestyle stresses” which are severely affecting my emotions, my ability to relax and my length/quality of sleep. To put it mildly, this year’s prep has been one hell of a lot harder than last year’s. So, quite honestly, I didn’t know what to expect from this BioSig!

However, what I did know is that – good or bad – I would use the result as a starting point from which to improve. If the results were good, then great! It would give me the encouragement to carry on. If they were bad, well, hey ho, things can only get better from here! That’s how I was approaching it.

Either way, I knew I was in safe hands with Ben. He’s hugely professional, completely non-judgemental and utterly committed to helping his BioSig clients regardless of the challenges they’re facing.

I hope you can see the image (click to enlarge), which also includes the details of my previous two BioSigs to compare. Although, as Ben said, I shouldn’t let the % increases freak me out (!), since I was incredibly lean last time he took my measures.

Here’s what Ben had to say:

“The results of your latest BioSignature assessment indicate oestrogen, especially ‘xenoestrogen’ (foreign oestrogen, the hamstring site) as your main priority. What we can also see from your measurements is that the triceps (2) and pec (3) are also high on the list.

“When the pec is high on the list of priorities this indicate the person is aromatising their own testosterone/androgens into oestrogen. T,his could be caused by the presence of xenoestogens but in this case your hamstring measurement is not far of normal range so there is likely to be another contributing factor to the conversion of androgens to oestrogen and causing this hormonal imbalance.

“The lifestyle stresses we have discussed that you have been under recently and the detrimental affect it has been having on your sleep patterns and quality could be a leading factor in this process. Whenever we produce stress on the body (physical or mental) we produce cortisol, this sends our body into a catabolic state and increases the production of other hormones (including oestrogen) and decrease in the beneficial hormones (such as testosterone and growth hormone). It is likely that if you are stressed throughout the day and also if you are not sleeping and recovering properly, the amount of time spent in this catabolic state and the increase in oestrogen could be the main source of the problem.

“We will re-introduce the fibre cycle to help eliminate any foreign oestrogens and toxins, along with the ‘Methylator’ supplement to improve the excretion of the toxins and focus on trying to reduce cortisol in the evening and improve sleep. We are going to introduce two types of magnesium to help improve sleep quality ‘Uber Mag with Tryptophan’ and ‘Uber Inositol with Magnesium Taurate’. Magnesium is a ‘Yin’ mineral and contains calming properties so taking this in the evening will help you to wind down and relax, so when you get into bed you are ready to sleep. The ‘Uber Mag’ contains Trytophan, the amino acid which helps to produce ‘serotonin’ (the sleep hormone). The ‘Uber Inositol’ has ‘adaptogen’ properties, meaning it will help to rebalance neurotransmitter production, reducing those which are too high and increasing those which are too low. This is great for those who go to sleep ‘wired’ and can’t switch off.

“Hopefully with the improvement in sleep we should see less time spent in a catabolic state, reduction in cortisol, reduction in aromatisation and increase in growth hormone.”

Thanks, Ben! Here’s to my re-assessment in a few weeks time. I have a goal in mind… and I think I can get there! ๐Ÿ™‚

Stress is something which affects many of us, not just bodybuilders prepping for a competition. So I asked Ben to give some general advice which can be used by anybody, sporty or not. I hope these nutrition, sleep and relaxation tips help:

Dealing with Cortisol in the Real World

(Ben says)

“We are exposed to so many different stresses nowadays that elevated cortisol is very common and can be the main cause of low energy, an inability to lose weight or struggles to gain lean muscle. Here are my top tips to reduce cortisol levels.

“When looking at reducing cortisol during the day and improving energy, food choices are the biggest factor. Breakfast is hugely important as this sets you up for the day. You want to have a breakfast that is high in amino acid ‘tyrosine’: this increases the neurotransmitter ‘dopamine’ which is responsible for attention span and drive. Food that contain high levels of tyrosine are egg, red meats and wild meats. So we recommend the ‘Meat and Nuts Breakfast’.

“Your typical breakfast of cereal will spike insulin – and, as a result, spike cortisol – and increase serotonin, which promotes sleep. That’s probably why you have low energy. Throughout the day you want to eat more lean proteins, vegetables, smart fats and avoid refined or processed carbohydrates. You can consume carbohydrates, just chose better sources such as quinoa, sweet potato, brown or wild rice and berries. In the evening you want to have more white meats or fish as these foods contain higher amounts of the amino acid taurine: this is converted to Gabba so will help with sleep. Some carbohydrates in the evening will help with the production of serotonin (the sleep hormone) but again make sure its not a refined or processed source.

“Earlier on in the day, you could add a slice of two of lime to your water: improving your PH levels can also help reduce cortisol, don’t do this in the evening though as you need to be slightly acidic for sleep.

“To improve sleep you need to help your body switch off in the evenings so that when you get into bed you are ready to sleep. Here are some ideas:

1) A ‘mental dump’: this can be something as simple as a to-do List for the next day. By writing it all down you move those thoughts to the sub conscious so when you go to bed they are not running through your head.
2) Remove stimulation. Have a certain time in the evening before you go to bed where you don’t use electrical devices, get off Facebook or Twitter, stop answering emails and text messages.
3) Create the Cave. We are supposed to sleep in the dark, that’s why its harder to get up in winter than it is in summer. There should be no light in the room so invest in some good curtains or a black-out blind. Even the standby light on your TV or radio is enough to disturb sleep. Remove things that emit radiation, this will stimulate your body and affect sleep. Put mobile phones, laptops, iPads in another room, you’re asleep anyway so you’re not going to need them!

Thank you Ben!

Ben is a PICP level 2 trainer and BioSignature Practitioner. You can read Ben’s blog – full of great advice and snippets of handy info – here and follow him on Twitter.

My Biosignature starting point, and advice for combating stress is a post from The Fit Writer blog.

Nicola Joyce – the Fit Writer – is a freelance copywriter and journalist who writes for the sport and fitness industry. Her main website is here.


Update on my bodybuilding biosignature experience

September 18, 2011

Morning! I’m up in Glasgow competing in the BNBF Final today but in the meantime, here’s a quick blog post for you all.

Remember this post, where I described my biosignature assessment with local practitioner, Ben Lauder-Dykes? I went for a retest just a few days ago to see how the final month of prep (and the changes Ben recommended) might have changed my body composition and caliper measurements.

Hopefully you can see the below – click to enlarge

Here are the readings from my first test on 13th August
Hamstring: 18mm
Pec: 3.2mm
Sub-scap: 7.4mm
Knee: 4.8mm
Umbilical: 6.2mm
Calf: 5mm
Midaxilliary: 4mm
Supralliac: 4.2mm
Tricep: 6.4mm
Quadricep: 6.4mm

All that came out at 6.7% body fat although, as Ben explained, he’d typically account for a 2% error-margin either way.

Here are the readings from my retest on 15th September
Hamstring: 7.6mm (down 10.4 – 57.8%!)
Pec: 2.6mm
Sub-scap: 6.6mm
Knee: 5mm
Umbilical: 5.4mm
Calf: 4mm
Midaxilliary: 3.4mm
Supralliac: 3.4mm
Tricep: 6.2mm
Quadricep: 5.4mm

All of which came out at 4.1% body fat (with a 2% error-margin either way).

Here’s what Ben had to say about my retest:

After the initial BioSignature assessment, the hamstring (which relates to external estrogens) was the priority, meaning Nicola needed to follow an estrogen detox protocol.

This included “multi intense” to improve phase 1 detoxification and zinc deficiency, “digestforce” to improve digestion helping to improve phase 2 detoxification, and 3 types of fiber, rotating the source every 8 days to help the body excrete the estrogen toxins. I also recommended Nicola step up her consumption of fish oils to improve E2 estrogen, improving the E2:E4:E16 balance.

Nutrition protocols included meeting the protein goal 1.98-2.18g per kg (this will improve phase 2 detoxification) and as much cruciferous veg as possible, things like brocolli, cauliflower, sprouts, watercress, kale – although Nicola was already doing both.

The screen shot shows a comparison between the 2 most recent tests. Pay particular attention to the bottom table where it details the % change of the sites.

Overall bodyfat has reduced 2.7%, hamstring reduced a very impressive 57.8%, pec reduced 18.8% and “love handles” 19%.

This again shows Nicola truly practices what she preaches and I am very pleased with the progress she has made. I look forward to hearing how well you do at the British today and wish you the best of luck, you truly deserve it. If it wasnt in Scotland I would have definitely been there to cheer you on!

Thank you Ben, and thank you (I think!) for that final training session you put me through just a few days out from competition. I’m feeling great today and know that your advice and the training sessions we did together contributed to that. Keep an eye on my Twitter feed for updates today.

Ben is a PICP level 2 trainer and BioSignature Practitioner. He’s helped 100s of people achieve their goals, from fat loss to increasing muscle mass, competition prep to sports performance. Through experience and consistent studying, he’s learnt that changing your physique is not as hard as most people think, you just need to do the right things more often. He says he guarantees to dramatically change anyone’s physique in 8-12 weeks (if they do the right things often enough!) – in fact he offers a full money-back guarantee. He practices what he preaches, too: having reached the final of the Men’s Health Cover Model and World Sports Model competitions. “So, I know these things will work!” he says.

Ben can be contacted via BFit Personal Training Solutions or his blog, and he’s on Twitter and Facebook.

Update on my bodybuilding biosignature experience is a post from The Fit Writer blog.

Nicola Joyce – the Fit Writer – is a freelance copywriter and journalist who writes for the sport and fitness industry. Her main website is here.


My bodybuilding biosignature experience

August 19, 2011

I mentioned last week that I was going for a BioSignature assessment with a local practitioner, Ben Lauder-Dykes. It was all a bit too much information to take in and remember at the time, so I decided to wait until Ben emailed my results before I blogged about it.

In summary, I’m really pleased with what the test revealed about my hormonal profile. Quite honestly, I couldn’t have asked for a better result given my current goals. The priority area for improvement is my hamstring skinfold – and that relates to external factors rather than genetic ones or things like stress/sleep which I might find difficult to control during contest prep. The things which can affect and improve hamstring skinfold are things I’m confident I can do something about.

Here’s my BioSig result. It will mean something to those of you who know about Poliquin‘s BioSignature method. Those of you who don’t can learn more about it here and can read about what the different skinfold sites relate to here.

Nicola Joyce bodybuilder biosignature

You can click to make it bigger, but here are the readings (not including chin and cheek which don’t relate to hormones):
Hamstring: 18mm
Pec: 3.2mm
Sub-scap: 7.4mm
Knee: 4.8mm
Umbilical: 6.2mm
Calf: 5mm
Midaxilliary: 4mm
Supralliac: 4.2mm
Tricep: 6.4mm
Quadricep: 6.4mm

Which comes out at 6.7% body fat although, as Ben explained, he’d typically account for a 2% error-margin either way.

Ben offered the following comment about my test. I promise I didn’t ask him to say any of this!

BioSignature is a skinfold test which assesses 12 specific sites on the body that relate to individual hormones. This shows us your hormonal profile or ‘BioSignature’. Using nutrition, lifestyle and supplement protocols we can spot reduce fat and achieve dramatic and lasting fat loss, body composition change and lean muscle gain. It is likely that your hormones are putting the brakes on in your race for results!

Do you struggle to lose fat from certain areas, no matter how hard you train or diet? If you answered yes then
1) it’s not your fault
2) and it can be changed!

Onto Nicola’s results

After completing the assessment the software lists the 12 sites in order of priority, 1 being of highest importance. Here are your ‘issues’, Nicola.

1) Hamstring – relates to external estrogens
2) Pec – relates to androgen levels (which relate closely to aromatisation of testosterone into estrogen)

More about the hamstring skinfold

The hamstring skinfold relates to external estrogens. These come into the body through toxins in tap water, plastics and some cosmetic products. Contraceptive pills/injections can also increase external estrogen as can belly button piercings.

The body should be able to detox these estrogens out of the body – this occurs in the liver. Phase one: the body attaches a vitamin or mineral to the toxin. Phase two: it attches an amino acid to the toxin and it is then excreted. Sounds pretty simple, but deficiencies in zinc lead to low stomach acids, poor absorption of the nutrients available in the foods we eat and inefficient use of vitamins and minerals. This all has a very detrimental affect on our body’s ability to detox. This inability to detox estrogens will lead to higher levels of estrogen and more feminisiation in both males and females. This in turn will lead to fat gain. (This is why women have higher body fat levels and find it harder to lose fat as they have higher estrogen levels.)

Pec and triceps skinfold

Increases levels of estrogen can lead to more aramotisation of testosterone into estrogen. This will mean more fat stored on the pec and triceps. This is another reason females stuggle with ‘bingo wings’, as this site is related to testosterone levels. Females can still get lean triceps – 6mm being the lowest – whereas for a male it should be 4mm at its highest.

Sub scapular skinfold

Another important site is the sub scapular. This shows us how tolerant you are to carbohydrates. A person is either genetically tolerant or not and unfortunately only approx 25% of people are gentically tolerant. If you’re genetically tolerant then the skinfold will always be 8mm or under; if not, you will never get it below 8mm. Nicola, at 7.4mm you are what we call a ‘Carbohydrate BITCH!’

Nicola’s BioSig: in summary

You have the best BioSignature I have seen. I am a perfectionist and often a very hard person to please but I have to admit I am VERY impressed! Your dedication and application is excellent and is represented not only in your great physique but your great health.

There is a saying in bodybuilding: ‘Fit for Stage’. Most competitors step on stage looking visually incredible but in terms of overall health they are far from healthy. The increasing stresses they put on the body each competition makes it harder and harder for them to get into shape. Overall health is of the utmost importance and you seemed to have struck that balance perfectly. I think you have a lot of potential to make some very significant improvements to your physique and think you could definitely be a dark horse at the British Finals. Let me know where I can get my ticket from?!

Wow, well thank you Ben. What great feedback, I really appreciate it. I’m ready to listen to what you have to say on our follow-up appointment: let’s see if we can get that hamstring reading down!

Ben is a PICP level 2 trainer and BioSignature Practitioner. He’s helped 100s of people achieve their goals, from fat loss to increasing muscle mass, competition prep to sports performance. Through experience and consistent studying, he’s learnt that changing your physique is not as hard as most people think, you just need to do the right things more often. He says he guarantees to dramatically change anyone’s physique in 8-12 weeks (if they do the right things often enough!) – in fact he offers a full money-back guarantee. He practices what he preaches, too: having reached the final of the Men’s Health Cover Model and World Sports Model competitions. “So, I know these things will work!” he says.

Ben can be contacted via BFit Personal Training Solutions or his blog, and he’s on Twitter and Facebook.

As for those tickets – they’re actually on sale now from TicketSoup.

My bodybuilding biosignature experience is a post from The Fit Writer blog.

Nicola Joyce – the Fit Writer – is a freelance copywriter and journalist who writes for the sport and fitness industry. Her main website is here.


Busy weekend (part 1: IFBB Grand Prix)

March 22, 2011

Last weekend was a busy one! I’m going to split this blog post into two, actually. Part one covers my Saturday: I headed into London to the Excel Centre (driving from Berkshire to the Excel Centre….both the DLR and Jubilee lines were down!) where the IFBB Grand Prix was being held for the first time.

I was there primarily to meet an Editor (hi John!) but thought it would be a great opportunity to nosy round the expo, grab some free samples ๐Ÿ˜‰ and immerse myself in the world of bodybuilding. I’m still so new to it, everything’s an eye-opener.

It was a fun day! Here are some photos which I thought might amuse, entertain and inform.

I met Jamie Eason, US fitness model and competitor who was on the bodybuilding.com stand. She was absolutely lovely, so sweet and seemed genuinely happy to talk to everyone who wanted a photo with her (and there were hundreds!) She asked me about my comp and gave me some sweet advice. Nice lady!

Here are a few huge chaps

This is Robby Anchant, top UK amateur bodybuilding competitor and all round nice guy. I asked him for a photo just cos he was a huge guy who happened to be walking past and I thought it would be funny for the blog. We ended up having a right giggle. I suggested we “get our guns out” and he told me he’d rather we didn’t as he was afraid I’d show him up. “My arms aren’t really my strong point,” he said. LOL! Here’s the photo we ended up with:

But I quite like this one too because of my face?!

The IFBB Grand Prix didn’t just concern bodybuilding: there was also strongman (which has always fascinated me!), MMA (no photos, but I saw Dane Bowers next to the cage – I assume he was commentating rather than fighting?!) and BMX/stunt riding.

I didn’t stay around for the actual show, which is a shame as I would have loved to watch. I must see a show before my own show dates roll around – I know I’d learn so much from watching pros and seasoned amateurs up on stage.

Oh, and here’s my stash of freebies – minus the four of five sachets and packets of stuff I’ve already consumed. Yum! Tee hee!

Stay tuned for part 2 – on the way home from the Excel, I picked up my friend and coach Kat Millar who came to stay for..er…just under 24 hours (we’re busy ladies!) and we packed two training sessions in during that time. Photos and training updates to come! ๐Ÿ˜€

Were you at the IFBB Grand Prix? Did I say hello to you?


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