Closing In On My Blood Donation Challenge

July 28, 2016

donate blood uk

I’m just back from giving blood and – as instructed – am putting my feet up rather than operating heavy machinery or doing a Hazardous Activity.

Today was my 38th donation. Not bad, given how I’m 39 and all. My personal challenge is for my number of donations to overtake my age. So I need to donate twice more in the next 11 months…

Are you a blood donor? There was a first-time donor at the session tonight who looked to be in her mid-30s. I wondered what made her decide to start now? I’m always curious about the reasons behind people’s decision to donate. (I didn’t ask her, don’t worry!)

Here’s my story. I hope it encourages at least one new person to register as a blood donor and turn up at that first session.

The NHS Blood Donation website
Register as a blood donor

I first gave blood in my early 20s, although the event that triggered my decision happened a few years earlier. When I was 17, my sister and her Mum (my step-Mum at the time) were in a car crash. It was bad – very bad. My sister’s Mum was in a coma for a time, and in the ICU for a good while after. My sister was in hospital for months, both legs in traction. Suffice to say the whole thing was a huge shock and pretty traumatic.

We got the news overnight, and I went to the hospital the next day. As I left to go back to school, I picked up two things from the hospital reception: information about becoming an organ donor, and information about giving blood.

I’ve given blood, on and off, for nearly 20 years. I try to do it as regularly as I can (tattoos and body piercings have slowed down my average!) I won’t lie, it’s not the best thing in the world. But it’s nothing like as bad as some people imagine.

Is it painful?
No. Honestly, the bit which “hurts” me the most is the pin-prick thing they do on one finger to check your iron levels. The actual donation part is almost painless. Sometimes there’s a sharp scratch feeling as the needle goes in. But not every time. Tonight, for example, I honestly barely felt it. It does not hurt during the donation, nor when they remove the needle.

Does it take ages?
No. My PB (yes, I am competitive with myself over donating blood…) is around 5:45. Tonight was mega-slow for some reason: 9:20! WTF! Women’s donations take longer than men’s (less body mass, smaller veins). The entire session usually takes around 40 minutes from walking through the door, filling out the questionnaire thingy, and finishing up your cuppa and snacks😉 It will be quicker if you pre-book. Walk-in sessions can be slow at busy times, obviously.

Are the people good at it?

Yes. They’re fully trained (obviously) and this is their full time job. They’re efficient, friendly, and always make you feel at ease. They’re really lovely, actually. Holla to “Brian” who oversaw my donation tonight.

It is scary?
I guess it could be a bit daunting at first. Fear of the unknown and all that. But you’ll get used to it. It’s made very easy for you, and the sessions are relaxed, quiet, and you won’t be rushed. The website is easy to use, there’s an app, and they’ll text you little reminders before your session. Staff are always extra-kind and caring to first-timers.

Does it wipe you out?
I’ll admit that it does affect me a bit. I usually donate in the evening, so all I have to do when I get back is eat and go to bed. I’m fine by the next day. There’s plenty you can do to minimise the effects: drink lots of water, get enough sleep (they’ll give you plenty of advice). I have very low blood-pressure, which might explain why it does leave me feeling a bit drained. Pun intended.

Why do you do it?
See above. I realise that not everyone has a “story” like mine – indeed I hope you don’t!

If you are a blood donor, what made you decide to donate? And if you’re not, what fact, statistic, or event might persuade you to start?

Closing In On My Blood Donation Challenge is a post from The Fit Writer blog.

Nicola Joyce – the Fit Writer – is a freelance copywriter and journalist who writes for the sport and fitness industry. Her main website is here.


Answering Questions About Channel Swimming

July 22, 2016

swim the channel swimming questions answers
Did you watch the documentary film on BBC4 this week – “Swim The Channel”? It was a touching, very honest look into a world most people know very little about.

I know a fair bit about this random topic – I swam the English Channel solo in 2004 and again in 2008, and have also been part of a relay team that swam there and back. I also swam around Jersey in 2007.

This blog has a decent amount of posts, pages, and FAQs about Channel swimming. So I’m not surprised to see that lots of people have found their way here this week, from Googling various Channel swim-related search terms.

Here follows the laziest blog post ever a timely and responsive blog post😉 , using exact search terms people have Googled… and answering them.

“what fat do they use on people swimming the channel”

As far as I know, it’s still Vaseline or similar. That’s what Barrie (the guy you saw “greasing people up” on the BBC4 film) used on me last time his be-gloved hand smeared its way around my armpits. I recall (all too vividly) the one day in training that we all tried something different. It wasn’t good. We emerged from our 6+ hour training swims that day red raw and chafed to smithereens. Back to Vaseline, please!

“cover body on goose fat for swimming”

I’m not sure what the three people who typed this into Google meant. Let’s have a guess….why do/do Channel swimmers cover their entire body with goose fat for swimming?

They don’t. I believe they did, once, many many decades ago. They certainly used lanolin (“sheep grease”). If you have a picture in your mind of a Channel swimmer coated head to toe in a thick white layer, that’s probably where you’ve got the idea of “goose fat” from. It’s kind of a Channel myth which won’t die.

Nobody uses goose fat, goose grease, or indeed lanolin any more. It stinks, it’s heavy, it gets cold and breaks off in chunks, and it covers everything it comes into contact with (including your goggles, and your pilot boat when you get in).

“why do swimmers wear goose fat”

See above. They don’t. Goose fat is for excellent roast potatoes, not for swimmers.

“why do swimmers grease up”

To prevent chafing. Think about it: hours and hours (9 if you’re fast, and lucky, 24+ if you’re not) of swimming in salt water. Your costume will chafe you. Your own skin will chafe you. Chaps, your stubble will scratch your shoulders as you turn your head repeatedly to breathe. Even if you shave before leaving for Dover marina, by the time you finish your swim it may be starting to grow back (if you are uber-manly).

A Channel swimmer might maintain a stroke rate of 60 spm during the swim. The average swim time is probably 15 hours. That’s 50,000+ turns of the arms. 50,000 times the armpit skin will rub against itself. 50,000 times your thighs might rub together. “Grease” (Vaseline) goes some way to easing the chafing.

It’s not to keep warm.

“channel swimmers why grease duck fat”

See above. No. This myth is strong in this one!

“why 6 hour swim Channel swim”

I think the four people who Googled this are referring to the 6-hour qualifying swim which was mentioned in the BBC4 film. To be eligible to swim the Channel, you need to do various things (including a medical) – one of which is complete a 6-hour swim in water of relevant temperature. This is part of the paperwork. If you haven’t done your qualifying training swim, you won’t be able to start your swim.

Ideally, that’s the very least you’d do. Be realistic – your Channel swim is likely to take 12+ hours. If you’ve only ever done one 6-hour swim, you have no idea how your body and mind cope from 6:01 until…whenever you finish. I swam in late July, and I did 7 hours (Saturday) and 6 hours (Sunday) several times. If your swim is later in the season, you should be doing 7+7 or 7+6 as often as possible. It sucks, but not as much as aborting your swim at 7 hours because you haven’t prepared properly.

Think of your 6-hour qualifying swim as a milestone in training, not the end goal.

“swim channel in dark why”

Channel swims set off according to tide times. So – unless you’re very fast, or swimming on the longest day of the year – you will probably swim through darkness for some portion of your swim. Both mine started at around 2am (just a coincidence). So I started in pitch dark, and swam through the dawn. It was beautiful, one of my most cherished memories, and something I can’t really put into words. Other swimmers might “land” (finish) their swims in the dark. Just one of those things!

“why do cross channel swimmers not wear wetsuits”

They can do. You are allowed to swim the Channel in a wetsuit. But it won’t “count” as an official Channel swim, and you will not be listed in the record books or the lists of successful Channel swimmers. Why? It’s just the way it is. The rules of real Channel swims state you can wear a swim suit, hat, goggles, ear plugs, and a lightstick for night swimming. That’s it. It’s a bit like asking “why can marathon runners not use roller skates?” They could. They’d still cover the 26.2 miles. But they wouldn’t be in the list of people who ran it.

There are various challenges that involve swimming across the English Channel, wearing a wetsuit. Arch to Arc is one such challenge. Clearly if you do that, you would have “swum the Channel” as part of “completing the Arch to Arc”. But you wouldn’t be able to say you were a “proper” Channel swimmer.

I hope that doesn’t sound elitist. It’s just the rules of a very old (and purist) sport.

Hope that was useful or at least interesting! Do you have any questions about Channel swimming?

I have another Channel swimming blog post planned after watching the BBC4 Swim The Channel film this week. I’ll get to it!

Answering Questions About Channel Swimming is a post from The Fit Writer blog.

Nicola Joyce – the Fit Writer – is a freelance copywriter and journalist who writes for the sport and fitness industry. Her main website is here.


My UK Health Radio Interview: Bodybuilding and Channel Swimming

July 3, 2016

nicola joyce interview uk health radio bodybuilding

Does ANYBODY like the sound of their own voice? I don’t. It won’t surprise you that I’m far more comfortable being interviewed in print

…but UK Health Radio managed to persuade me to go on their Fitness Hour Show to big up the sport of drug-free bodybuilding. I’ll take any opportunity to talk about it people who might not know about the sport. So… here I am! In all my “I sound like a 5-year-old” glory.

You can listen again to it via this link >> Nicola Joyce bodybuilder interview on UK Health Radio

(I’m the opening interview on the show – it’s just after the first song – at around 5 minutes in)

As predicted, I went off-piste… here are a few of the topics the interview covers:

– My background in Channel swimming
– What goes through your brain when you’re swimming the Channel?
– What are the skills you need to be a Channel swimmer?
– Is swimming the Channel scary?
– How and why did I make the transition from swimming to bodybuilding?
– Can anyone get involved in bodybuilding?
– Is age a barrier in physique and strength sports… or a bonus?
– What are the different categories and types of bodybuilding?
– Is bodybuilding healthy or not?
– How can a bodybuilding lifestyle benefit our health?
– Why is lifting weights and eating like a bodybuilder healthy (even if you don’t compete)?
– What does “clean eating” really mean? Is it always a good thing?
– Healthy lifestyle improvements vs extremes of diet and exercise
– Advice for anyone wanting to get into bodybuilding

Hope you enjoy the interview. If you think it would be interesting or useful to anyone you know, please do share.

Nicola Joyce UK Health Radio Interview: Bodybuilding and Channel Swimming is a post from The Fit Writer blog.

Nicola Joyce – the Fit Writer – is a freelance copywriter and journalist who writes for the sport and fitness industry. Her main website is here.


thefitdog on “Take Your Dog To Work Day”

June 24, 2016

This is a post from Frankie, the office dog.

Hi, friends!

I am dictating this blog post to Nicola from my bed (nothing new there, I hear you say). Ah, but today I am not just lazy! I am RECUPERATING! Yesterday I fell asleep at the vet’s and he stole another bit off my body. The first time was the worst – it was ages ago – he took my nuts! Then another time, he took a little lump off my leg. Yesterday, he took my dingly-dangler (technical term for a skin tag).

Anyway. All of that is to say that I’m very glad it’s Take Your Dog To Work Day today, because I need Nic here with me in case my brow needs mopping (or in case I try to bite my stitches).

Screen Shot 2016-06-24 at 11.50.02

And that’s what I want to write about today…

The fine invention that is Take Your Dog To Work Day. It’s a real thing! Personally, I feel that every day should be TYDTWD. I think having your dog at work with you has huge benefits, not just for the dog but for the human, too.

Here’s why every day should be Take Your Dog To Work Day.

Less Stress

Everyone knows that it’s nice to stroke a dog. But did you know that it’s actually a medical fact: stroking a dog’s fur has been proven to boost your levels of the “happy hormones” serotonin and dopamine. And just having a dog around helps humans manage their stress levels. You’ll have lower blood pressure, and you’ll be able to calm down and think things through.

Frankie’s Top Tip: stroke the ears, they have magical stress-busting properties (not medically proven).

More Productive

Everyone knows that people are more creative and productive at work when they take short breaks every now and then. You need to stretch your legs, get a change of scene, breathe some fresh air. Errrr… hello! An office dog could help with that! Having a dog around will encourage you to be less sedentary and take regular breaks, which could help you figure out a work problem or get through a plateau.

Frankie’s Top Tip: take the office dog outside for a wee even if he or she doesn’t need one.

Better Working Environment

According to some study (Nic did tell me where it is, but I forgot), 90% of employers who allow dogs say they have noticed a positive change in the working environment. Half of them said there’s been a decrease in absenteeism, and 67% said the office dog has improved staff morale. GO DOGS! Well, we’re just nice to have around aren’t we? We’re cute, and funny, and usually pretty laid back. I can completely understand how an office dog would improve morale at work – and therefore attendance!

Frankie’s Top Tip: make sure your office dog is cute/funny/cuddly so you want to see him or her every day.

Nic says she feels very lucky to be able to “bring me to work” every day (she actually works in our house, and I sleep just round the corner from her desk). Here’s how I help her during the day:
Screen Shot 2016-06-24 at 11.49.39

– Walk before work every day
Nic says our morning walk helps her switch from “home mode” to “work mode”. It means she doesn’t just let the work day take over. She gets some time to get her thoughts in order. By the time we’ve had our walk, she feels fully awake, focused, and ready to tackle her workload. And because we’ve already been outside, she doesn’t get any FOMO if it’s a nice sunny day.

Screen Shot 2016-06-24 at 11.49.21

– Regular breaks for cuddles
If Nic has been sitting down for ages, or if she’s feeling frustrated with some bit of her work, she’ll just come over to me and we’ll have a quick cuddle. Sometimes Nic will sing me a song. She always goes back to her desk feeling calmer, happier, and ready to tackle the work.

Screen Shot 2016-06-24 at 11.50.24

– Fresh air during the day
Nic knows she spends too long sitting down. It’s an occupational hazard. So I’ll often whine at her periodically during the day as a handy reminder that she needs to stretch her legs. If she’s busy, we’ll just go out into the garden for some sunshine and fresh air. If she has a bit longer to spare, we’ll pop out onto the field behind our house and walk round once or twice. When Nic wore an activity monitor, she noticed that these little walks really added up!

Are you allowed to take your dog to work with you? Big up Pets At Home, Google, Amazon and co for all allowing dogs in the workplace. They know a thing or two about business!

Speaking of business… I need to go in the garden.

Thanks for reading! Frankie xoxox

thefitdog on Take Your Dog To Work Day is a post from The Fit Writer blog.

Nicola Joyce – the Fit Writer – is a freelance copywriter and journalist who writes for the sport and fitness industry. Her main website is here.


Stealth Cardio Tactics (No Treadmill Required)

June 23, 2016

Cardio doesn’t have to be a dirty word. It’s been a long time since I was involved in endurance sport, but I still enjoy cardio*. However, I don’t often fancy the idea of plodding on a cross trainer for half an hour.

(*I realise that i might be kicked out of the bodybuilding “fam” for admitting this.)

So I employ Stealth Cardio tactics.

If you enjoy working up a sweat, but don’t want to do “traditional” gym indoor cardio, here are my 4 current favourites.

nicola joyce on a bike
Cardio disguised as commuting
I’ve been riding my bike to the gym (and back, obvi) a couple of times a week. Only when it’s sunny, mind. It’s not far – maybe 4 miles each way – but it involves a steep hill whichever way I go. (The gym is in the “East Cliff” part of town which should tell you something). So there’s 30+ minutes of cardio right there.

Only it doesn’t feel like cardio because 1) I like riding my bike, 2) it’s serving a purpose to get me to the gym and back again and 3) there’s plenty to see.

PS That photo is not recent. But it makes me laugh because it’s me, riding my bike, apparently to swimming club (note the 80s towelling swimming bag).

dog in a kayak
Cardio that’s funny
If you only need to do cardio for general activity levels, then the best kind is the funny kind IMO. Frankie thefitdog would agree. Here we are, attempting to paddle about together in a sea kayak. Quite possibly I found that funnier than he did. But you get my point. Challenge your kids to some sprints around the local playing field. Go and play badminton (or whatever sport you used to love) with a mate. Cardio can be fun, honest.

tabata on concept2
Cardio that’s so tough you can’t think about it til later
When I do cardio at the gym, my new favourite is the rowing machine. I’ve had some great advice from my fellow writer friend Patricia Carswell of Girl On The River, who’s a Proper Rower. I don’t know why I love the Concept2 so much, but I do! I think it’s because it’s proper hard cardio which makes me sweat buckets and feel like I might die a bit. (Don’t forget, I come from a very “ultra distance” endurance sport background).

I’ve mainly being doing “a href=”https://www.tabataofficial.com”>tabata on the rowing machine. If you’re not sure what tabata is, it’s a structured form of intense interval training. One “tabata” is 8 rounds of 20 seconds HARD work/10 seconds recovery (4 minutes). I do 2 Tabatas – 16 rounds, for a total of 8 minutes.

I’ve also done a couple of 5000m rows, and a 2000m row just to see how long it would take me. Point being, if you choose a form of cardio that’s so challenging that you can’t zone out or get distracted, you might actually feel more inclined to do it. Maybe. If you’re weird like me!

Cardio that’s so short you don’t notice it til later
Finally, this is something I’ve been doing once a week: adding 1-minute bursts of cardio in to my weights workout (as giant sets). At first I wasn’t sure if this would actually feel effective. Erm… I can report that it definitely does.

The idea of course is to make the 1-minute bursts hard, so your heart rate stays high and you break a sweat. You could do this by hopping on a piece of cardio equipment, or by using a skipping rope, or doing any kind of bodyweight move like burpees. If your gym has conditioning kit (battle ropes, sled, prowler) or strongman events equipment (farmers walk handles, tyres to flip) then that would work, too. You can easily add 20 minutes of cardio to your day by doing it this way. 20 x 1-minute feels more manageable – and more fun – than 20 minutes of zombie mode on the cross trainer.

Do you do any cardio at all? What’s your favourite approach?

Stealth Cardio Tactics (No Treadmill Required) is a post from The Fit Writer blog.

Nicola Joyce – the Fit Writer – is a freelance copywriter and journalist who writes for the sport and fitness industry. Her main website is here.


Tips From The Bodybuilding Judging Table

June 14, 2016

Are you stepping on a bodybuilding stage this year? This might be worth a read – especially if you’re a first timer or novice.

I’ve judged at a few UKDFBA bodybuilding shows (and am doing so this year). Let me tell you, judging is a huge eye-opener. Even if you’re a competitor! (Perhaps especially if you’re a competitor?)
ukdfba bodybuilding judging
(Image by AllSports Photography at the UKDFBA USN Classic 2016)

Judging really helps me see what a difference the small details can make. Some are things I know (but can forget). Others are things I would never have thought about…

Here are some “tips” from behind the judges’ table.
(By the way, if you want more like this, I recommend two articles on Jon Harris’s natural muscle.co.uk website – this one written by Jon and this one written by Karen Mason).

TAN
Every competitor knows tan is important. But first-timers might not realise just HOW important it is to get your tan right. Your tan (colour, coverage, evenness) does make a difference to how well the judges can actually assess your size, shape, condition. A poor tan can make it really difficult for judges to judge you properly.

Advice: if you’re doing your own tan, practice it a couple of weeks beforehand. If the show organiser has a professional tanner at the venue, consider using her. But book your appointment in good time!

YOUR NUMBER
You’ll get two numbers (same number twice – you know what I mean!) Pin one to the back of your suit, the other on the front. Make sure it isn’t upside down (particularly if your number contains a 6 or a 9!) Do a round of posing in the waiting area with your number on, so you can see whether or not your hands are going to knock/brush the number as you pose. Look in a full length mirror to check that your hands don’t obscure the number during any poses. If it falls off on stage (which it might), don’t panic. Wait until the Head Judge tells you to “relax” (i.e. after that round of posing is over), and pick it. Worst case scenario, leave it there. And remember your number! The Head Judge might call it out (to move competitors around in the line up). Don’t be the one who’s standing there looking blank whilst the Head Judge says “number 3. Number 3! Yes, that’s you… number 3…. please swap with number 5. No, number 3. Yes, that’s you. Number 3….”

Advice: judges need to see your number (front and back) and you need to know what it is.

POSING
Please spend time learning and practicing your poses. Good, confident posing is a joy to watch and can encourage the judges to keep their eyes on you. In fact, good posing can mean it’s difficult to take your judging-eyes OFF you! Poor posing, on the other hand, just does you no favours. Judges can’t judge what they can’t see. So if you’re not showing off a body part, or not posing something properly, it’s incredibly difficult for the judges to assess you in that area.

Advice: get someone experienced to teach you how to pose. Then practice – LOTS. Get someone to check your progress (ideally the person who taught you). Attend posing clubs/workshops if you can get to one.

HIT YOUR POSES QUICKLY AND CLEANLY
There’s a difference between posing with style, and posing with necessary faff. When the pose is called, just move into it. By all means transition into it slightly differently (everyone has their style) but don’t mess about trying to draw attention to yourself (or a body part), and don’t try to be the last person hitting the pose. Two things are possible: the judges won’t notice any of it anyway (so conserve your energy), or they will notice, but for the wrong reasons (being frustrated and wishing you’d just pose properly).

Advice: be confident enough in your posing that you don’t need to add flourishes and embellishments. Move into poses in a timely manner, and then hold them.

FREE POSING
I know you might be nervous, but try to relax and give a confident free posing routine. This is your chance to have the stage to yourself! It’s finally time to show us your routine and to pose to that music you chose so long ago. Enjoy it! I can’t speak for all judges, but personally I absolutely love watching people’s free posing routines. So bear that in mind: the judges are looking forward to seeing this, they want to see you enjoying yourself. Walk on confidently, and walk off confidently too!

Advice: be confident in your routine, choose music which makes you feel good and positive, then go out there and enjoy it!

BLING
Figure and Bikini competitors will often choose to spray glittery stuff on after their tan. And many will wear blingy jewellery. That’s all fine, but please don’t go overboard. Make sure it accentuates your physique. Don’t create a distraction for judges. Less is often more, even if you are Figure or Bikini. Let your stage presentation, posing, and your own stage presence shine instead!

Advice: choose enough bling to accentuate your stage presentation, but don’t go overboard.

“FLAPPY” HANDS & FLIPPY HAIR
Pay attention to your hands, both in poses and whilst moving between poses. Minimise flappy hands or overly-artistic finger pointing. Chances are you either think it looks better than it does, or you don’t realise you’re doing it at all. And if you’re wearing long hair down, don’t make a big deal about moving it to one side to show your back. Hair-swishing can be part of Figure and Bikini stage presentation, but don’t overdo it. Think classy and understated, not OTT. Let your physique do the work, not your hair. Another reason to practice posing (and get people’s feedback). Video your own posing practice so you can see if you have any random hand/finger stuff going on!

Advice: flappy hands are just distracting.

REMEMBER: SOMEONE WILL BE LOOKING AT YOU
Go on stage thinking that at least one judge will be looking at you every single moment you’re up there. This includes walking on, walking off, when you’re being moved about in the line up, when you’re standing at the back of the stage, waiting for presentations, and as presentations are called. Obviously only some of these are being judged. But you might be in photos at any moment. So hold your pose, try to look relaxed, and try to smile (or least not look like you’re about to kill somebody). I know it’s a lot to think about. But it is worth bearing in mind.

Advice: just remember that at least one pair of eyes is on you at all times. Plus the camera, potentially.

WE CAN SEE YOU, I PROMISE
Even if you’re out at the end of a long line of competitors, off to one side of the stage, the judges can see you. I promise. And if you’ve been out to one side, you will be moved to the other side (so the judges at that end of the table can see you more closely). The judges have the best seats in the house. And the Head Judge will move everyone around so each competitor can be seen by each judge. In fact, judges can actually request to “see” certain competitors again (or in a different order) if they feel they haven’t had an adequate opportunity to look at them properly.

Advice: don’t panic, we can see you – and we are looking!

LEGS!!!
I can’t end without mentioning legs. Seriously, pose your legs! All the time! You might hear coaches in the audience shouting out “stay on your legs”. This means pose them, flex them, then hold that – even when it starts to hurt. As a competitor, I always knew this. And I always tried to do it. But I didn’t really think it made all that much difference. I mean, of course I’m posing my legs, it’s fine. Then I sat at that judging table. And I saw with my own eyes just how massive the difference is between the person “kind of” posing his legs “most of the time”, and the person really, really thinking about it and posing the legs hard. It’s night and day. And not doing it could cost you a place – or more. Remember, judges can only judge what they can see. So all your amazing striations, feathering, shape, condition… they can only be judged if you pose your legs hard enough for them to come out. “Legs!!!!”😉

Advice: pose from the bottom up – set your legs in every pose before you hit the rest of the pose. Practice this, so you get used to how it feels without a mirror.

Tips From The Bodybuilding Judging Table is a post from The Fit Writer blog.

Nicola Joyce – the Fit Writer – is a freelance copywriter and journalist who writes for the sport and fitness industry. Her main website is here.


29 More Books To Add To Your Reading List (Swiped From Smart Folk)

June 9, 2016

book list recommendations business mindset
I had some complaints about my previous book-recommendation post.

Apparently it increased the size of people’s Amazon wishlists and “Books To Read” lists to uncomfortable levels.

Well, sorry about that! By way of apology, here are 29 more book recommendations as swiped from the conversations and Facebook posts of interesting people:)

You’ll be pleased to know there are no more books on my swipe-list.

Just…a load of podcasts😛

Self-Development
The Power Of Now, Eckhart Tolle
Extreme Ownership, Jocko Willink and Leif Babin
As A Man Thinketh, James Allen
The Universe Solved, Jim Elvick
Changes That Heal, Henry Cloud
Vision Of The Anointed, Thomas Sowell
Tipping Point, Malcolm Gladwell
The Art Of Learning, Josh Waitzkin
The 1 Thing, Gary Keller

Mindset
Unbeatable Mind, Mark Divine
Lead The Field, Earl Nightingale
Manifest Your Destiny, Wayne Dyer
Dianetics, L Ron Hubbard
Choice Theory, William Glasser
No More Mr. Nice Guy, Robert Glover

Business
Die Empty, Todd Henry
The 10X Rule, Grant Cardone
Start With Why, Simon Sinek
Freakonomics, Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner
The Millionaire Fastlane, MJ DeMarco
So Good They Can’t Ignore You, Cal Newport
Good To Great, Jim Collins

Fiction, Biography, Autobiography
Obvious Adams, Don Farrell
The Power Of One, Bryce Courtenay
Man’s Search For Meaning, Viktor Frankl
Essays, Ralph Waldo Emerson
Self Reliance, Ralph Waldo Emerson
Meditations, Marcus Aurelius
Letters From A Stoic, Seneca

Which of these books have you read? Should I fast-track any of them to the top of my reading list?

29 More Books To Add To Your Reading List (Swiped From Smart Folk) is a post from The Fit Writer blog.

Nicola Joyce – the Fit Writer – is a freelance copywriter and journalist who writes for the sport and fitness industry. Her main website is here.


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